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COVID-19

CORONAVIRUS, COVID-19 and NMOSD


What is coronavirus and COVID-19?

The coronavirus is a family of viruses that can cause respiratory and intestinal infections in humans and animals.* Coronaviruses are typically very common causes of colds. COVID-19 is a disease caused by a new coronavirus termed SARS-CoV-2 or 2019-nCoV, which has infected humans. It has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization.**

What are the symptoms?

Image obtained from Ohio Department of Public Health.

How is it spread?***

Predominant proposed mechanism of spread of the virus (transmission):

Coronavirus is thought to spread predominantly person-to-person. This can occur between people who are in close contact, within about 6 feet. This person-to-person transmission can occur through respiratory droplets when someone infected coughs or sneezes. It’s thought that people are most contagious when they are the sickest, or most symptomatic.

Other potential mechanisms of transmission:

It’s possible that people can spread the virus when they’re asymptomatic, or before they are showing symptoms. The virus may also be able to be spread by contact with contaminated surfaces and objects. This can happen if a person touches something that has the virus on it, and then touches their own mouth, nose or maybe even eyes.

The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily in the community in affected areas, giving the term community spread. This means that people have been infected in an area and aren’t sure how or where they became infected.

What’s the risk?***/*****

Reported cases of COVID-19 have ranged from no reported symptoms or very mild to severe, including fatality. Based on available data, COVID-19 cases are mostly mild, however 16% have been deemed severe. People who are at greatest risk of severe infection are those in high risk groups, including: those with older age, heart and lung disease and the immunocompromised (impaired or weakened immune system). COVID-19 can lead to development of pneumonia and in severe cases, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

What about NMOSD treatments?

Many treatments for NMOSD work by suppressing the immune system. In general, people with NMOSD who are treated with immunosuppressants have an increased susceptibility to infections. There is currently no data available on any commonly used treatments for NMOSD and the new coronavirus and COVID-19 outcomes.

If you are an NMOSD patient receiving treatment and have concerns about your risk for COVID-19, do not stop your treatment without discussion with your NMOSD care clinician. If you have symptoms suggestive of COVID or have been in close contact with a person known to have COVOD-19 or believe to have COVID-19, stay home and contact your NMOSD clinician team right away.

What can we do?***

There are no vaccines or approved (anti-viral) treatment for the new coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Our greatest ability right now as a society is to work together to practice social distancing, meaning avoiding/reducing contact with others to help reduce the rate of transmission of the virus. ‘Flatten the curve’ refers to slowing the spread of the pandemic by using social distancing practices. This reduction in the number of infected people, or rate of transmission of the virus, aims to decrease the potential of over-burden on our healthcare system by COVID-19. Those in the high risk group, including NMOSD patients receiving immunosuppressant treatments, are strongly recommended to strictly follow these precautions.

Ways to stay safe:

  • Stock up on supplies including medications

  • If you work and can work from home, do it!

  • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly, using 20 seconds as a standard

  • Sneeze or cough into the crest of your elbow- the ‘dab’

  • Avoid contact with known infected

  • Practice social distancing

    Image from Vox: https://www.vox.com/2020/3/10/21171481/coronavirus-us-cases-quarantine-cancellation

What if I'm a family member or living with someone who is at risk, like an NMOSD patient receiving immunosuppressant treatment?

Those living or in daily close contact with a member of a high risk group should behave as if they are in the high risk group.

The CDC has guidelines for family members and caregivers. Below are the guidelines directly pulled from the CDC's website***:

  • 'Know what medications your loved one is taking and see if you can help them have extra on hand.
  • Monitor food and other medical supplies (oxygen, incontinence, dialysis, wound care) needed and create a back-up plan.
  • Stock up on non-perishable food items to have on hand in your home to minimize trips to stores.
  • If you care for a loved one living in a care facility, monitor the situation, ask about the health of the other residents frequently and know the protocol if there is an outbreak.'

What are good resources for more information and updates?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/index.html

World Health Organization:

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

Follow your state public health department on social media and find their website for more local information and updates.

For information related to COVID-19 and rare neuroimmune disorders, including NMOSD, visit the Siegal Rare Neuroimmune Association's site for more information and access to other related resources:

https://wearesrna.org/information-on-covid-19-for-individuals-with-rare-neuroimmune-disorders/?fbclid=IwAR3I216r0N6ou06kIkYJW36svGX8Uo_fcuciuXjlvET7D_deYJdfhqIlesw

Are there any lifestyle tweaks that can help with the immune system?

In general, living a well-balanced lifestyle helps support your immune system. This includes getting adequate, well-rested sleep, exercising, and maintaining a nutritious diet.

There are some studies that support maintaining a good level of Vitamin D, which has been associated with immune system regulation and autoimmune disease.

Anxiety and related-stress can hamper your overall immune response, which suggests that practicing calming activities and mindfulness could be helpful.

You can learn more about these wellness/lifestyle factors on our 'Wellness' tab: https://www.connorbjudgefoundation.org/wellness/

* Cui J et al, Nature Reviews Microbiology, 2018.

** https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

*** Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), Center for Disease Control and Prevention, https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov

**** Wang H et al, Cell Discover, 2020, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41421-020-0148-0

***** Guan W et al, NEJM, 2020.

Top image of coronavirus is from Nature.com